Tulita - Great Bear River

 

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 

                                 Fog on the Mackenzie

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 Canada goose

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 

Food, fuel, building materials and vehicles are shipped by barge down the Mackenzie River from Hay River on Great Slave Lake to Tuktoyaktuk, then on to communities in the High Arctic 

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 

A fresh land slide !  Any process which results in the exposure of icy sediment to thaw may induce a landslide. Thawing not only reduces cohesion but may also reduce frictional strength of the sediment especially if ice in excess of the sediment pore volume is present. The water produced by thaw must escape but until it does so, it carries the weight of the slope sediments, decreasing the friction between soil particles. Landslides caused by elevated pore water pressures due to thawing ground ice are common in the Mackenzie Valley 

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 Burning coal before Tulita 

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 

The burning coal seams are located beneath the surface of the ground, burn slowly, and tend to create cracks and open vents or fumaroles at the surface as a result of moisture depletion and deformation of the soil and rock from the intense heat being released. The sulphur smell of burning coal is also evident in the coal vein area. 

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 


© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 Arriving at Tulita

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 Bear Rock  

 The legend of bear rock 

At the three red circles on Bear Rock a great man, named Yamoria, killed three beavers. These giant beavers were hunting the people and killing them. The beavers came from Great Bear Lake and they created the rapids on the Bear Rivers. Yamoria was the Dene Law Giver, who was sent by the Creator to make things right between man and animal. Yamoria was sent to bring order in a time of chaos. Yamoria killed these three beavers in Tulita (formerly Fort Norman). Their hides were nailed and stretched on Bear Rock Mountain for everyone to see. Yamoria made a fire to cook these three beavers and their fat burns today at the smokes. These smokes are located a few miles up the Mackenzie River. (the burning coil vein !) It is said if you see the fire in the smokes, you will live a long time. ( Hurray, I am getting verry old !) Yamoria then went on top of Bear Rock Mountain and shot two arrows into the Mackenzie River where they can still be seen to this day.  

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

Tulita is a located at the junction of the Great Bear and Mackenzie River, at 64°54'N and 125°35'W. It is 620 kilometers from Yellowknife, and 72 km from Norman Wells.
Tulita was originally known as Fort Norman. The Northwest Company established the community in either 1804 or 1805. The original community was located on the Mackenzie River opposite the Red Stone River. The trading post was moved 3 times thereafter by the Hudson Bay Company. The Northwest Company established a trading post in 1810, and Sir John Franklin used the site as a starting point for his expeditions. The Anglican Church was built in 1860. The community has not moved since 1869.

 

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 

       On the way to the Rapids on the Great Bear River 

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 Jet Power... 


© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 The Great Bear River  

 The 113 km (70 mi)-long Great Bear River, which drains the Great Bear LakeMackenzie River, forms an important transportation link during its four ice-free months. It originates at south-west bay of the lake. The river has irregular meander pattern 350 m (1,148 ft) wide channel with average depth 6 m (20 ft). Historic air photos show no evidence of bank erosion or channel migration in a 50 year period. westward through marshes into the

The low discharge rate is due to small amount of precipitation in watershed area. Great Bear River contained open reaches that had melted out in place over 80% of its length in 1972 and 1974.  


 

The possible constructions of a natural gas pipeline down the Mackenzie Valley has given rise to the opportunity of generating and supplying hydroelectricity to the pipeline operators. To meet this opportunity, it has been proposed that a hydrogeneration station be built on the Great Bear River at the St. Charles Rapids. The project would invole constructing an 88ft high earth filled dam and installing 2 turbines initially. A third turbine could be added later to give a maximum generation output of 126 MW from this site. Projected cost of development is $600 million, including transmission line costs.............


© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 

        Filming from the Jet Boat is not easy at all ... 

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 

The Boat launch is an old Barge Landing, no chance to get ORCA in the Water. This is the End for us on the Great Bear River. We cant make it up the Bear River to the Great Bear Lake.... Damn..... 

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 

The Rapids on the Great Bear River. Way to shallow for our Outboard   ORCA.... 

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

                                  I try my best...


© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 

Guest at  Benny Doctor camp/ at Great Bear River /  Bennet Field 

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 

    The Buerger Family 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 

            Back in Tulita, getting Gas for our ORCA.


© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 

Guest at the Buerger Familys home in Zilita. Thanks for your great northern hospitality  

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 

               Steve Sisson, a friend of the Buergers 

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 

     Sundown at Tulita... 


© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 

      Nice to see some wildlife on the Great Bear River.. 

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 

                   Red Fox at Great Bear River.  

 

© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier
© 2007 Copyright by Ch. Breier

 

Goodbye to Tulita, and the Bear Mountain and unfortunately to the Great Bear Lake.........

 

Next: Mackenzie River 4          

 

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